MTA: TIDC Presentations

Tourism & International Development Colloquium

Presentations

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Points of Intervention in Research on Tourism for International Development: Is it Better to Lead or Follow?


Dr. Hannah Messerli
IITS-IGIS Colloquium, Keynote Presentation | October 2, 2015

As a multi-disciplinary activity that crosses economic, environmental, and socio-cultural efforts, tourism research can take on a wide variety of issues. Some of these focus exclusively on tourism, while others are integrated into wider concerns. What are the needs and opportunities for tourism research that are distinct, in contrast to those that augment integrated applied research across the international development arena? This review of recent World Bank tourism initiatives highlights diverse approaches and points of intervention that offer opportunities for researchers as the global development agenda tackles an expanding range of issues that include climate change, pandemics, and crisis response.

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Driving—and Redefining—Tourism-Based Development through Heritage Research: Perspectives from the Slave Wrecks Project


Dr. Stephen Lubkemann
Co-authors: Dr.Jonathan Sharfman, Dr. David L. Conlin, Kamau Saddiqi, & Dr. Paul Gardullo

IITS-IGIS Colloquium | October 2, 2015

This paper draws upon the collaborative experience of a coalition across seven institutions. The Slave Wrecks Project conducts research and tourism development in five world regions. We archeologically document transatlantic slave trade material remains while building local capacity to address economic, social, and political challenges, using a broad stakeholder base that includes local scholars, policy-makers, and various segments of the “public.” We recast archeology as a tourism development activity through a “HAVENS” derivate of “SAVE Tourism” (in which “Heritage” and “Network-building” join Scientific, Academic, Volunteer, and Educational). With this, as we discuss, we seek to advance heritage research and protection and redefine “tourism” and “development.”

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A Banker’s Fantasy and Oro por Espejitos: Development Outcomes in Cancun and Punta Cana


Emma Fawcett
IITS-IGIS Colloquium | October 2, 2015

This paper compares Cancun, Mexico and Punta Cana, Dominican Republic. Both destinations emerged at roughly the same time, peddling sun-and-sand tourism to the U.S. and European markets and exploiting vast stretches of uninhabited, white sand beaches. The private sector drove Punta Cana’s development while the Mexican government spearheaded that of Cancun; now, most of Punta Cana’s dispersed worker settlements lack basic services while the influx of Haitians migrant workers creates added social tensions while Cancun holds the unfortunate title of “Mexico’s suicide capital” and has a domestic violence crisis. I argue that the underlying causes of these challenges stem from the institutions (or lack thereof) that created each tourism pole.

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The Role of Diaspora Tourism in the Diaspora-Engagement Value Chain


Dr. Liesl Riddle
IITS-IGIS Colloquium | October 2, 2015

Research on diaspora tourism explores the role of tourism in fostering diasporic identity; case studies have improved understanding of how visitation can shape an individual’s self-concept. Diaspora tourism also is recognized as part of a critical role as a “coping strategy” for migrants to ease acculturation stress in the country of residence. Governments meanwhile find diaspora tourism an important revenue source although primarily with a focus on immediate visitation expenditures. More attention is needed on diaspora participation in longer-term forms of engagement in their country of origin economies through philanthropy, volunteerism, remittances, and investment. This paper draws on field research recently conducted among the Indian and Sierra Leonean diaspora communities, exploring possible ways diaspora tourism can be leveraged to encourage this engagement.

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Facility and Community Level Environmental Certification: Price Premium Substitutes or Complements?


Dr. Jorge E. Rivera
Co-author: Juan Roeschmann

IITS-IGIS Colloquium | October 2, 2015

Our research examines how firms’ price premiums are affected by performance in facility and community level environmental certification programs. This research seeks to quantify the combined price premium effects of two voluntary environmental certification programs: one focused on firm facilities and another focused on communities. We analyze two major voluntary environmental certification programs in Costa Rica using panel data for the entire population of hotels and beach communities between 2001-2008. Our findings suggest that, to gain the greatest price premiums from a certified “green” reputation, it is necessary for a firm to be located within a host community that receives collective environmental certification and shows the highest levels of certified facility-level environmental performance.

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Multi-Country Destination Strategies in the Americas


Dr. Donald Hawkins
IITS-IGIS Colloquium | October 2, 2015

Promoting multi-country destinations can be an efficient and profitable strategy to attract visitors that might not otherwise consider visiting the destination. This is particularly true in the case of tourists who want to make the best of a long-haul trip by combining various countries in the same area that complement one another. In the case of the Americas, this can be of particular interest to increase the share of tourists from Europe and from Asia and the Pacific, which today represent respectively 17% and 7% of all international tourist arrivals in the region. Research suggests five fundamental challenges to consider when developing multi-country destination tourism and finds that the more advanced the regional integration system, the more opportunities will be generated for tourism.

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Legal Issues in Cross-Border Reproductive ‘Tourism’


Susan Crockin, JD
IITS-IGIS Colloquium | October 2, 2015

With intended parents seeking access to reproductive treatment around the globe, there are significant issues for research and tourism development involving family, immigration, health law and rising concerns over exploitation and human trafficking.

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Mixed-Use Tourism Development in China: Local Government and Interorganizational Governance


Dr. Larry Yu
Co-author: Dr. Jim Weng

IITS-IGIS Colloquium | October 2, 2015

Mixed-use tourism development is an integrated and sustainable model of tourism growth around the world. Economic expansion and changing consumer behaviors demand the various and more sophisticated services and experiences of mixed-use development, a phenomenon with ramifications in destination resorts and urban communities. However, due to the scope and complexity of this development, few studies examine the governance mechanism and stakeholder involvement. This research attempts to fill this gap by examining the mixed-use tourism development in China. Using the concepts of regional clusters and the development state at local levels, this study examines inter-organizational governance within a mixed-use tourism development zone. The results have implications for public policy and destination management.

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Tourism, Heritage, and Human Rights: Is it Really Time to let UNESCO Off the Hook?


Dr. Robert Shepherd
IITS-IGIS Colloquium | October 2, 2015

This talk discusses the claim that UNESCO is becoming increasingly powerless in its attempts to shape management guidelines at world heritage sites. State authorities, it is claimed, promote tourism at these sites, engage in policies that harm local communities, and pay little heed to UNESCO. By examining heritage and tourism policies at a selection of Chinese world heritage sites, this paper shows how in the case of China state actors indeed put into practice UNESCO guidelines. The harm that results for local residents is thus a direct outcome of UNESCO recommendations. I suggest that UNESCO policies that recommend buffer zones around heritage sites and visitor limits can only be fully implemented in states that lack strong civil society institutions.

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Discussion


Dr. Lisa Delpy Neirotti
IITS-IGIS Colloquium | October 2, 2015

This is a review of the IITS-IGIS Colloquium that ties the presentations together with other important research topics in international development.

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Combined Q & A with Dr. Kristin Lamoureux & Dr. Jane Henrici


IITS-IGIS Colloquium | October 2, 2015

Topics and details beyond those provided within the presentations are explored with the participation of those attending this event.

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