Accountancy

Overview

The Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) with a concentration in Accountancy provides undergraduate students with the analytical tools and conceptual framework needed to understand and record financial transactions.   Accounting is the management of financial information.  Accountants design and implement systems that capture relevant information from transactions in which an organization engages, analyze it, and communicate it to others.

Comparison with the Bachelor of Accountancy Degree

GWSB offers two options for students to study accountancy: the Bachelor of Business Administration degree (BBA) with a concentration in Accountancy and the Bachelor of Accountancy (BAccy) degree.  For students who plan to work as an accountant, often with a CPA designation, the BAccy degree program is more appropriate because it offers substantially more extensive preparation in accounting.  The BBA degree with an Accy concentration is intended to be paired with a complementary field of concentration.  In the BAccy degree program, students take ten upper-level accounting classes, compared to five courses for the BBA concentration in Accountancy.  For BBA students who plan to pursue careers in finance, Accountancy is an ideal second concentration with Finance because it provides a strong background in the accounting information that underlies many financial decisions. BBA students with a concentration in information systems often pursue jobs related to accounting information systems, which would make Accountancy an excellent choice for a second concentration.

COURSEWORK

For students who entered GWSB between Fall 2009 – Summer 2014:

BBA: Accountancy Concentration Required Courses (Fall 2009 Curriculum)

For students entering GWSB beginning Fall 2014:

BBA: ACCY Concentration Required Courses (Fall 2014 Curriculum)

Career Options in Accountancy

Students who complete the BBA field of concentration in Accountancy should be particularly strong candidates in the job market because of how this field complements other concentrations.  For example, students who also select a field in Finance would be particularly well-prepared to apply for professional positions such as a credit analyst, equity analyst, or financial analyst.  The stronger background in Accounting should make students substantially more attractive to potential employers because finance jobs rely heavily on accounting knowledge. Students who also have a concentration in ISTM would be particularly qualified for information systems jobs involving accounting information.