GW-CIBER Scholar Profiles




picture of Deborah D. Avant Deborah Avant, Director of International Studies and the Center for Research on International and Global Studies, UC Irvine
Professor Avant is an adjunct fellow at the Pacific Council on International Policy. Her research has been funded by the Institute for Global Conflict and Cooperation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Olin Foundation, and the Smith Richardson Foundation, among others. She serves on the editorial boards of several journals including the American Political Science Review, Security Studies and International Studies Quarterly as well as on the steering committee of the Institute for Global Conflict and Cooperation. She has chaired the International Security Studies Section of the International Studies Association (ISA) and served on several boards including the executive board of ISA, the executive board of Women in International Security (WIIS) and the board of visitors for the Western Hemisphere Institute for Security Cooperation (WHINSEC).
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Meghana Ayyagari, Associate Professor of International Business
Meghana Ayyagari received her Ph.D. in Finance from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2004. She teaches courses in international financial management and international business. Professor Ayyagari's expertise is in international corporate finance, with a focus on the role of institutions on firms, innovation, and entrepreneurship. Her research interests also include the theory of the firm with an emphasis on the constraints faced by firms in developing economies. Professor Ayyagari's academic research has been published in the Review of Financial Studies, Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, and Small Business Economics.
Professor Ayyagari has served as a consultant for several international organizations including the Development Research Group at the World Bank, USAID, and the Center for Institutional Reform and the Informal Sector (IRIS). Professor Ayyagari is a member of the American Finance Association (AFA), Western Finance Association (WFA) and the Academy of International Business (AIB) and has served as a referee on several finance, economic and management journals.
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Susan Aaronson, Research Professor of International Affairs
Susan Ariel Aaronson is Research Professor at The George Washington University's Elliott School of International Affairs and the former Minerva Chair at the National War College. She directs a fellowship fund for students working on internet issues, the eBay Policy Scholars, and has organized a seminar series on Internet issues. While at GWU, Aaronson has received grants from the MacArthur, Ford, Swiss National Science Foundation and Ford Motor Company for her work on internet freedom and trade, corruption, and business and human rights. Her current research focuses on malware, trade and trust; the WTO and conflict; and repression, civil conflict and socio-economic outcomes. Dr. Aaronson is a frequent speaker on public understanding of globalization issues and international economic developments. She was a regular commentator on "All Things Considered" in 1994–1995, "Marketplace" from 1995–1998, and "Morning Edition" from 1998-2001. She has also appeared on CNN, the BBC, and PBS to discuss trade and globalization issues. She has also been a Guest Scholar in Economics at the Brookings Institution (1995–1999); and a Research Fellow at the World Trade Institute 2008-2012.
Dr. Aaronson is the Treasurer of Giganet; serves on the Advisory Board for Business-Human Rights; and is a Senior External Advisor to the Business and Society Team of Oxford Analytica. In recent years, she has been a pro-bono advisor to the UN Special Representative on Transnational Corporations and Human Rights, and the Congressional Human Rights Caucus. She has also consulted for the ILO; the World Bank; Free the Slaves; the Ford Foundation; the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative; the Stanley Foundation; several corporations; and the governments of Canada, Belgium, and the Netherlands, among others.
Aaronson is the author of six books and numerous articles on trade, human rights, internet governance, and other issues related to globalization.
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Senay Agca, Associate Professor of Finance
Professor Agca received her Ph.D. from Virginia Polytechnic and State University in 2002. Her areas of expertise include fixed income, credit risk, derivatives, corporate finance, and international financial markets. Her papers have been published in Emerging Markets Review, Journal of International Economics, Journal of Banking and Finance, and Journal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis, among others. She has been teaching courses in Fixed Income Security Valuation (Graduate), Financial Management (Graduate), and Topics in Empirical Finance (Ph.D.).
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Joel Blit Joel Blit, Associate Professor of Economics, University of Waterloo
Prior to joining Waterloo, Joel Blitt was an Assistant Professor of Economics and International Affairs at the George Washington University. He has also worked as a business consultant to financial services firms in Asia, Australia, and North America. His engagements included reorganizing the activities of a major bank and formulating the strategy for a $US 100M startup. Joel holds a MASc in Computer Engineering from the University of Waterloo, a MBA from INSEAD, and a PhD in Economics from the University of Toronto.
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Alasdair Bowie Alasdair Bowie, Associate Professor of Political Science and International Affairs
A native of New Zealand, Professor Bowie's research focuses on comparative political economy, development and Southeast Asia. He is co-author of The Politics of Open Economies: Indonesia, Malasyia, the Philippines and Thailand (with Danny Unger), and author of Crossing the Industrial Divide: State, Society, and the Politics of Economic Transformation in Malaysia. He was a 2004-05 Woodrow Wilson Fellow, and has been named a 2010-11 Fulbright research scholar in Vietnam. His current research involves a comparative study of central-local government relations and economic governance in Vietnam and Indonesia. Professor Bowie speaks Indonesian and is a student of the Vietnamese language.
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Hein Bogaard, Assistant Professor of International Business
Dr. Bogaard received his Ph.D. in International Business and Business Economics from the Ross School of Management at the University of Michigan in 2009. As an economist for the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Bogaard developed policies to improve the business climate and promote financial sector development in Macedonia, Rwanda and Tanzania. Before that, Bogaard assisted the executive director for the Netherlands at the World Bank and worked as a senior economist at the Netherlands Ministry of Finance. He worked on issues including debt relief for developing countries, the financial policies of the World Bank and the IMF, and private sector development. Bogaard taught microeconomics and international business at the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business. He has presented research at the Academy of International Business, the Wharton School, George Mason University, the University of
South Florida and the University of Sydney.
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Jennifer Brinkerhoff, Professor of Public Administration, International Business, and International Affairs
Professor Brinkerhoff holds a Ph.D. in Public Administration from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, and a MPA from the Monterey Institute of International Studies. She teaches courses on public service, international development policy and administration, development management, and organizational behavior. She is particularly keen on encouraging people to pursue service careers thoughtfully, grounding their commitment to change in self-awareness and working in community. To that end, she and her husband, Derick W. Brinkerhoff, published Working for Change: Making a Career in International Public Service (Bloomfield, CT: Kumarian Press, 2005). Dr. Brinkerhoff has expertise on public-private partnership, governance, NGOs, development management, and diasporas. Her publications include six books, as well as three co-edited journal issues and over fifty articles and book chapters on topics ranging from evaluation, to NGOs; failed states; governance; and diaspora identity, development contributions, citizenship, and policy. She is the author of Digital Diasporas: Identity and Transnational Engagement (Cambridge University Press, 2009) and Partnership for International Development: Rhetoric or Results? (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2002); the editor of Diasporas and Development: Exploring the Potential (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2008); and co-editor of NGOs and the Millennium Development Goals: Citizen Action to Reduce Poverty (New York: Palgrave MacMillan, 2007). She is the co-director and co-founder of GW's Diaspora Research Program, a multidisciplinary research program on diasporas, identity, policy, and development. Her project examines the global challenges and opportunities of public-private partnerships, and seeks to better understand their range and potential.
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Elizabeth Chacko, Associate Professor of Geography and International Affairs
Professor Chacko received Bachelor's and Master's degrees in geography from the University of Calcutta in India. She also obtained a graduate degree in Public Health and a Ph.D. in geography from UCLA. Dr. Chacko has taught geography at various institutions including Loreto College in Calcutta, UCLA in Los Angeles, and the George Washington University. She is primarily engaged in research on human migration and its ramifications — the transnational connections between immigrants and their sending countries/societies, the creation and maintenance of ethnic spaces by immigrant groups in the receiving country, identity formation and retention among first and second generation immigrants, factors that aid or deter immigrant inclusion in cities and the relationships between migration and development in the immigrant sending countries of Ethiopia and India. She has conducted field work for her research projects in India, Ethiopia, Malaysia, Singapore and the United States. Prof. Chacko was named U.S. Professor of the Year from the District of Columbia in 2006 by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and Council for the Advancement and Support of Education. She is the recipient of a Fulbright scholarship to research the integration of different streams of Indian immigrants in Singapore (Fall, 2013).
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Maggie Xiaoyang Chen Maggie Xiaoyang Chen, Associate Professor of Economics and International Affairs
Professor Chen received her M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Colorado at Boulder and B.A. in economics from Beijing Normal University in China.
Professor Chen's main research interests include the organization of multinational firms, the role of multinational production in productivity and market reallocation, and the formation of regional trade agreements. Outside the field of international trade, she has worked on patent protection and innovation. She has published in numerous academic journals including Journal of International Economics, American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, European Economic Review, and Canadian Journal of Economics. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in international economics.
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Wenjie Chen, Assistant Professor of International Business
Professor Chen received her Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 2009. Chen’s research examines the impact of foreign direct investment on corporate performance with a particular focus on cross-border mergers and acquisitions by firms in emerging markets. In 2006 she worked in the Trade Division at the International Monetary Fund’s Research Department. She is a member of the American Economic Association and the Academy of International Business.
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Reid Click, Associate Professor of International Business and International Affairs
Reid W. Click received his Ph.D. in Economics and International Business from the University of Chicago in 1994. He teaches courses in international financial management, international business strategy, and international economics. Professor Click's academic research has been published in leading journals, including the Journal of Asian Economics, Development Policy Review, Journal of International Business Studies, International Journal of Finance and Economics, and Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control. His research has also been featured in Business Week and the Milken Institute Review. He is the coauthor of a textbook, The Theory and Practice of International Financial Management (Prentice Hall 2002), and coedited two volumes of International Finance Review -- Value Creation in Multinational Enterprise, with J. Jay Choi (vol. 7, Elsevier Ltd. 2007), and Latin American Financial Markets: Developments in Financial Innovations, with Harvey Arbelaez (vol. 5, Elsevier Ltd. 2004). Dr. Click has been a consultant for several international organizations, including the Association of Southeast Asian Nations, the United Nations Development Programme, the World Bank and Goldman Sachs Asset Management, and has been a Visiting Researcher at the International Centre for the Study of East Asian Development in Japan. During 2003, he served as Fulbright Senior Specialist in Krakow, Poland, and subsequently as Visiting Scholar at the Johns Hopkins University Bologna Center under funding from the World Gold Council. Since 2002, he has served as a consultant for the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).
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Dr.  Protiti Dastidar Protiti Dastidar, Tyser Teaching Fellow, Robert H. Smith School of Business, University of Maryland
Dr. Protiti Dastidar is a Tyser Teaching Fellow at Robert H. Smith School of Business. Prior to joining the Smith School faculty in the Fall of 2011, she was Assistant Professor at Temple University, Philadelphia and the George Washington University, Washington DC. Dr. Dastidar earned her Ph.D. in Finance from The Ohio State University, her MBA in Marketing from Webster University, Austria and her B.A. in Economics from the University of Bombay, India. She has successfully taught in MBA and undergraduate programs, having won several teaching awards. Dr. Dastidar worked as an international management consultant (at KPMG) providing strategic advice for leading companies and government agencies in Europe.
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M. Shahe Emran, Assistant Professor of Economics and International Affairs
M. Shahe Emran was educated at Stanford University (Ph.D. in Economics, Advisors: Joseph Stiglitz, Masahiko Aoki and Avner Greif) and Dhaka University (M.S. in Economics). He previously worked at the Bangladesh Institute of Development Studies and the World Bank. His research interests focus on Development Economics, Public Economics, and Applied Econometrics. His published papers include (1) "Estimating Import Demand Function in Developing Countries: A Structural Econometric Approach with Applications to India and Sri Lanka" (with Forhad Shilpi), Review of International Economics, forthcoming. (2) "Economic Liberalization and the Price Response of Aggregate Private Investment: Time Series Evidence from India" (with Forhad Shilpi and Imam Alam), Canadian Journal of Economics, August 2007. (3) "On Selective Indirect Tax Reform in Developing Countries" (with Joseph Stiglitz), Journal of Public Economics, April, 2005. (4) "Revenue-Increasing and Welfare-Enhancing Reform of Indirect Taxes on Exports", Journal of Development Economics, June, 2005. (5) "Weak-Separability of Non-Tradables from Consumer Good Imports: A Simple Test with Evidence from Bangladesh" (with Imam Alam), Economics Letters, May 1999, p. 225-234. (6) "Foreign Exchange Rationing and the Aggregate Import Demand Function," (with Forhad Shilpi), Economics Letters, June 1996, p. 315-322.
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Henry Farrell, Associate Professor of International Affairs and Political Science
Henry Farrell is associate professor of political science and international affairs at George Washington University. He has previously been a fellow at the Woodrow Wilson Center for International Scholars, assistant professor at George Washington University and the University of Toronto, and a senior research fellow at the Max-Planck Project Group in Bonn, Germany. He works on a variety of topics, including trust, the politics of the Internet and international and comparative political economy. His recent book, The Political Economy of Trust: Interests, Institutions and Inter-Firm Cooperation, was published in 2009 by Cambridge University Press. In addition he has authored or co-authored twenty-three academic articles, as well as several book chapters and numerous non-academic publications.
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Margaret Gonglewski, Associate Professor of German and International Affairs
Margaret Gonglewski came to GW to direct the German language program in 1995, after completing her Ph.D. in German at Georgetown University. Her scholarly work focuses on foreign language pedagogy, and she is co-author of Treffpunkt Deutsch, one of the top introductory level German textbook programs in North America. She has published articles on topics such as effective uses of technology in language teaching and learning, critical issues in materials selection, and the paradigm shift from language labs to language centers. From 2004 to 2008, Gonglewski served as the first Director of the GW Language Center, initiating innovative programming, as well as support and recognition for GW's language faculty. She has been awarded several grants for developing materials to assist faculty in teaching business languages, and she is currently Business Languages Coordinator for GW's Center for Business Education and Research, funded by a grant for the U.S. Department of Education. She won a Bender Teaching Award in her third year at GW and in 2002 she received the CCAS Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Academic Advising.
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Anna Helm, Assistant Teaching Professor of International Business
A member of the GWSB community since 2006, Professor Helm has been teaching Intro to International Business and International Marketing Management, as well as an International Residency in Sweden on the topic of Green Technology and Marketing Strategy. Through a grant from the Center for Civic Engagement and Public Service she has also developed a service-learning course entitled "International Perspectives on Green Business."
Her first book ""The Intersection of Material and Poetic Economy: Gustav Freytag's Soll und Haben and Adalbert Stifter's Der Nachsommer"" appeared in 2009. She is currently pursuing research on cross-cultural differences in consumer perceptions of green products.
In her capacity as GW-CIBER Business Language Co-Coordinator, she is also involved in research on business case methodology. Together with her colleague, Margaret Gonglewski, she has developed a video-based e-Handbook on Teaching with Business Cases.
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Llewelyn Hughes, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs
Professor Hughes received his Ph.D. from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 2009. His current research focuses on the international and comparative political economy of oil markets, and the political economy of climate change. He also has interests in the international relations of Northeast Asia and Japanese politics. Prior to joining the faculty Professor Hughes was research fellow in the Consortium for Energy Policy Research at the John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. His writings have appeared in International Security, Financial Times, The Diplomat among others. Professor Hughes has trained as a simultaneous and consecutive interpreter in the Japanese language, and is a citizen of Australia, New Zealand and Great Britain.
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Jai Kwan Jung, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Relations, Korea University Professor Jung received his Ph.D. in Government from Cornell University. His research and teaching interests include Korean politics, civil war and post-conflict peace-building, comparative democratization and political institutions, social movements and contentious politics.
Contact: jkjung@korea.ac.kr



Srividya Jandhyala, Assistant Professor of International Business
Srividya Jandhyala's research is driven by the confluence of politics and markets. She examines how institutions and government policies (or the lack of them) influence international investment strategy. She is also interested in how governments create an institutional environment to sustain economic activity. Srividya's research addresses issues surrounding international property rights in the technology, petrochemical, and other sectors. She has presented her research at several international conferences in International Business, Management and Political Science. Her work has been recognized by the Academy of International Business and the Academy of Management.
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Graciela Kaminsky, Professor of Economics and International Affairs
Graciela L. Kaminsky is professor of Economics and International Affairs at George Washington University and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. She previously held positions as assistant professor at the University of California, San Diego and staff economist at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System. She has been a Visiting Scholar at numerous government organizations, including the Bank of Japan, the Bank of Spain, the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, the Hong Kong Monetary, and the Monetary Authority of Singapore. She has also been a consultant to international institutions, including the Inter-American Development Bank, the International Monetary Fund, and the World Bank. She holds a Ph.D. in Economics from MIT. Professor Kaminsky has published widely in leading academic journals, including the American Economic Review, the Journal of Development Economics, the Journal of International Economics, the Journal of Monetary Economics, and the Journal of Economic Perspectives. Her research has been featured in the financial press, including The Economist, The Financial Times, and Business Week. Professor Kaminsky's research covers a variety of topics in macroeconomics and international finance, including financial globalization, mutual fund's investment strategy, currency and banking crises, contagion, credibility, and inflation stabilization policies.
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Stephen Lubkemann, Associate Professor of Anthropology and International Affairs
Dr. Lubkemann is a sociocultural anthropologist whose work focuses primarily on social and political change in nations that have experienced protracted conflict and violence; on migrants, refugees, and diasporas; on international development and humanitarian action; and on cultural heritage and maritime archaeology. Dr. Lubkemann has done extensive fieldwork in Mozambique, in South Africa, and with African refugees and diasporas in Europe and the U.S. His ongoing research includes a project initiated in 2004, with research grants from the United States Institute for Peace and the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation, that examines the political and socio-economic influence of displacement diasporas in their war-torn countries of origin through a specific study of the Liberian case. Since 2006, he has also been engaged in a major project in Angola, supported by the MacArthur Foundation, which examines the effects of "trans-generational displacement" on gendered relations, urbanization, and informal governance systems. In 2007, he initiated a new policy research project with USIP funding that examines customary legal practices in post-conflict Liberia. His work also critically examines the structure and effects of international humanitarian action and explores the potential of diasporas as a "third humanitarian space."
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Michael Moore, Professor of Economics and International Affairs
Professor Moore received his B.A. in Liberal Arts from the University of Texas at Austin and his M.S. and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He has been a faculty member at the Elliott School since receiving his doctorate in 1988. Professor Moore teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in international trade theory and policy as well as international macroeconomics. He also has taught international economics to US diplomats at the Foreign Service Institute and students at the Fondation Nationale des Sciences Politiques (Sciences-Po) in Paris. He has published in numerous academic journals including the Journal of International Economics, International Trade Journal, Canadian Journal of Economics, Review of International Economics, European Journal of Political Economy, and Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv, and has been a contributor to five books. His commentary has appeared in numerous media outlets, including The Washington Post, The Financial Times, CNN, CBC, NPR, and NBC. Professor Moore has served as Director of the Institute for International Economic Policy, Director of the International Trade and Investment Policy Program, and Associate Dean at the Elliott School. Professor Moore recently completed a year as Senior Economist for International Trade on the President's Council of Economic Advisors.
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Suzanne McCoskey, Assistant Professor of Economics, Frostburg State University
Dr. McCoskey received her Ph.D. in Economics from Syracuse University. Before joining Frostburg, she was an Assistant Professor of Economics at the George Washington University. From August 1997-May 2005 she was a member of the Economics Department faculty at the US Naval Academy, first as Assistant and then Associate Professor. In 2000, she went to the University of Pretoria as a Fulbright Scholar and taught in their PhD and Master's programs in econometrics. She also served as an International Economist (Instructor) at the Foreign Service Institute (US State Department) from May 2005 - May 2007. Dr. McCoskey is an Oberlin graduate and spent two years, 1990-1992, teaching English at Yunnan University in the People's Republic of China.
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Tenagne Haile-Mariam, MD, Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine; Co-chief, Wound Care and Hyperbaric Medicine Section
Profesor Haile-Mariam received her B.A. from Dartmouth College and her M.D. from Dartmouth Medical School. She is co-chief of the GW Hospital Wound Care and Hyperbaric Medicine Section. Her residency experience includes Residency in Emergency Medicine, George Washington University, Georgetown Medical Center; Fellowship in Infectious Disease, George Washington University, NIH; and Residency, Internal Medicine, George Washington University.
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Tjai M. Nielsen, Associate Professor of Management, High Point University
Dr. Tjai Nielsen is currently Associate Professor of Management at High Point University (HPU, www.highpoint.edu) and an international faculty member at Copenhagen Business School (www.cbs.dk). Prior to joining HPU in 2012, he was Director of Executive Education, Dean's Research Scholar and Professor of Management at The George Washington University School of Business. Dr. Nielsen has won multiple teaching awards for his work leading classes at the undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral levels. Dr. Nielsen's academic work has resulted in more than 25 research articles and book chapters and more than 50 invited talks and refereed conference presentations. Recently, Dr. Nielsen was invited to join a United Nations Expert Group on Diasporas and Development and received a Best Reviewer Award from the Academy of Management. He currently serves as an editorial board member for the Journal of Organizational Behavior and for the second consecutive year was recognized with a Best Reviewer Award. The majority of his research concentrates on the motivational and behavioral contingencies that impact leadership, team performance, and the dynamics of international investment patterns. Dr. Nielsen also integrates a significant background in consulting with his academic work. Dr. Nielsen earned his doctorate in Industrial and Applied Psychology from the University of Tennessee (Knoxville), his master's degree in Education from Western Carolina University, and he holds an undergraduate degree in Psychology from Virginia Tech. He is a member of the Academy of Management and the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology, among others.
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Anupama Phene, Associate Professor of International Business, Phillip Grub Professional Fellow, Phillip Grub Distinguished Scholar
Professor Phene received her Ph.D.in International Management from the University of Texas at Dallas in 1999. She also holds an MBA from the Indian Institute of Management and a Bachelor of Commerce from Bombay University. Before joining GW, Phene was an associate professor of strategy at the University of Utah. Prior to beginning her doctoral studies, she worked for American Express Bank in the treasury department. Phene’s research focuses on knowledge creation and transfer within and across firms, geographic boundaries of knowledge, multi-national firm and subsidiary evolution, and alliance mechanisms. She has authored publications in the Journal of International Business Studies, Organization Science, Strategic Management Journal, and Management International Review. She has also co-authored various book chapters. She was named the 2006 and 2008 “David Eccles Faculty Fellow” and received the 2006 “Brady Superior Teaching Award” at the University of Utah. Dr. Phene was recently awarded the "Oscar and Shoshana Trachtenberg Prize for Teaching Excellence" (2013-2014).
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Joseph Pelzman Joseph Pelzman, Professor of Economics and International Affairs, Professorial Lecturer of Law
Joseph Pelzman is a professor of Economics, International Affairs and Law. Professor Pelzman received his B.A. in economics from Boston College and began his MA in Soviet Studies at Harvard University. His Ph.D. in Economics was completed at Boston College in 1976. After 20 years as an economics faculty member, Professor Pelzman entered George Washington Law School and completed his JD in 1998. He is admitted to practice in the State of Maryland. He came to George Washington University in September 1980, after completing a year as a Brookings Economic Policy Fellow during the Carter Administration. During that year, he worked on the Tokyo Round tariff cutting exercise and along with his Bureau of International Affairs colleagues wrote the Report on US Competitiveness for the Carter White House. He previously served as Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of South Carolina.
Professor Pelzman has published articles in a number of leading economics journals, including the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, European Economic Review, and Southern Economic Journal. His primary professional interests are in the areas of international trade, international trade law and law and economics. Although he has conducted research on a variety of trade topics, including the trade potential of former Soviet economies, the People's Republic of China, Vietnam and Israel, he has focused on the economic impact of trade distortions, enforcement rules for dispute settlements and regional arrangements. He has also written extensively on the US textile and apparel industry and on the trade in quota instruments. His current work centers on terror and its economic impact: an econometric approach measuring volatility, delinking tariff liberalization and domestic tax reforms; deconstructing economic development in the Middle East - Israel's experience as the standard; post-MFA textile and apparel competition; and the WTO Dispute Settlement Understanding: enforcement and revision issues.
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Marie Price, Professor of Geography and International Affairs
Professor Price earned her BA from the University of California at Berkeley and a Ph.D. from Syracuse University. She was the Director of Latin American Studies from 1999-2001, and Chair of the Department of Geography until 2009. Dr. Price was recognized for her teaching with the 2005 Trachtenberg Prize for Teaching. A Latin American specialist, Dr. Price has conducted research in Belize, Mexico, Venezuela, Cuba, and Bolivia. She has also done research in Sub-Saharan Africa as well. Her studies have explored human migration, natural resource use, environmental conservation, and regional development. Dr. Price is co-editor with Lisa Benton-Short of Migrants to the Metropolis: The Rise of Immigrant Gateway Cities (2008, Syracuse University Press). She is co-author with Les Rowntree, Martin Lewis and Bill Wyckoff of Diversity amid Globalization: World Regions, Environment and Development, 5th edition, and Globalization and Diversity: Geography of a Changing World, 3rd edition. Her publications include articles in the Annals of the Association of American Geographers, Geographical Review, Journal of Historical Geography, Urban Geography, International Journal of Urban and Regional Research, Studies in Comparative International Development, and Focus. Her current research focuses on urban immigration, migration and development, and Latin America.
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Liesl Riddle, Associate Professor of International Business and International Affairs; Associate Dean for Graduate Programs; Co-Director, GW Diaspora Program
Liesl Riddle is Associate Professor of International Business and International Affairs at George Washington University and Associate Dean for Graduate Programs at The George Washington University School of Business (GWSB). As Associate Dean, she oversees 14 of GWSB's graduate degree programs, including five MBA and nine specialized masters programs. In conjunction with faculty advisory committees, she developed GWSB's Digital Community (GWSB:DC), a suite of online degree programs (MBA, MSPM, MSIST, MTA) that are offered through a digital-community environment. She also is the co-director of GWSB's OntheBoard program, a fellowship program designed to promote women on corporate boards. Dr. Riddle has written extensively about diasporas and development, international entrepreneurship, and trade and investment promotion. Having examined diaspora investment and entrepreneurship for over 20 years, Dr. Riddle has conducted research among 16 different diaspora communities in the USA and Europe originating from countries of origin in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, and the Middle East. From 2006-2012 she spearheaded a multidisciplinary research team, the George Washington University Diaspora Capital Investment Project, which generated and disseminated learning about diaspora investment and its role in development to assist policymakers, diaspora organizations, diaspora entrepreneurs, and researchers. She was a founding member and director of the university's Diaspora Research Program. Dr. Riddle teaches course at the executive, graduate, and undergraduate levels, including courses on Identity, Migration, and Entrepreneurship; Managing in Developing Countries; Global Perspectives; International Management; and the Consulting Abroad Practicum. She has received numerous teaching awards, including the GW School of Business' Teaching Excellence Award. She is a frequent guest speaker at the US Foreign Service Institute in the Near East North Africa Area Studies Program. Dr. Riddle holds a B.A. and M.A. in Middle Eastern Studies, a MBA in Marketing/International Business, and a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Texas at Austin. Prior to her appointment at GW in 2001, she worked in the field of market research and held the position of the Director of Research for an international market research firm.
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Jorge Rivera Jorge Rivera, Associate Professor of Strategic Management and Public Policy
Professor Rivera received his Ph.D. in Environmental Policy and Business Strategy from Duke University in 2000. His work focuses on corporate social and environmental responsibility, social labor standards, worker health and safety, consumer and environmental protection. Professor River’s research focuses on studying the relationship between business strategies and public policy in the US and developing countries. In particular, he is now pursuing work that seeks to understand business responses to the creation and implementation of environmental and social protection policies. His research has also been studying how institutional pressures are associated with corporate environmental protection strategies. This work has evaluated if participation in voluntary environmental programs is associated with business competitiveness and higher corporate environmental performance.
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Richard Robin, Professor of Russian and International Affairs, Director of Russian Language Program
Professor Robin received his Ph.D. in Slavic linguistics from the University of Michigan and has been at GW since 1981. His main interests include Russian phonetics and methodology of Russian language teaching. He teaches intensive Russian language courses. In addition to numerous articles on Russian-language pedagogy and the use of technology in the classroom, he has co-authored a number of textbooks: Golosa: A Beginning Course in Russian, a proficiency-based program, Russian for Russians, and Political Russian. He also coordinates distance-learning projects using authentic foreign-language materials on the Internet. He is the winner of numerous awards in pedagogy, including AATSEEL's 2006 Slavic Teachers of The Year.
Homepage: http://home.gwu.edu/~rrobin/.

Holger Schmidt Holger Schmidt, Assistant Professor Political Science and International Affairs
Holger Schmidt (Ph.D., Columbia University, 2008) is Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs. He received his B.A. from the Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universität in Frankfurt, Germany and also holds an M.A. in International Relations from The Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies. Professor Schmidt's research and teaching interests include the prevention and management of violent conflict, the causes of civil and interstate wars, and quantitative methods. His current research focuses on UN conflict management efforts in international crises and the role of impartiality and bias in determining the effectiveness of peacekeeping after civil wars. Professor Schmidt has received support for his research from a variety of institutions, including the John M. Olin Institute for Strategic Studies at Harvard University, the Folke Bernadotte Academy, Sweden, Columbia University's School of International and Public Affairs, and the German Academic Exchange Service (Deutscher Akademischer Austauschdienst, DAAD). He also serves as an advisor for the International Peace Institute's project on "Understanding Compliance with Security Council Demands in Post-Cold War Civil Wars."
Homepage: http://elliott.gwu.edu/faculty/schmidt.cfm.

Jennifer Spencer Jennifer Spencer, Director, GW-CIBER; Coelho Professorial Fellow and Associate Professor of International Business & International Affairs
Professor Spencer received her B.S. in Business Administration from Georgetown University and her Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota. She has taught international business and corporate strategy at the University of Minnesota, University of Houston, and George Washington University. Professor Spencer's expertise lies in international corporate strategy, with a focus on the global technology strategies of firms in high technology industries, knowledge spillovers between firms, international entrepreneurship, and multinational enterprises' investments into developing countries. She has published articles in the top journals in the management, strategy, and international business fields, including Academy of Management Journal, Academy of Management Review, Strategic Management Journal, and Journal of International Business Studies.
Homepage: http://business.gwu.edu/faculty/jennifer_spencer.cfm.

Susan K. Sell Susan Sell, Professor of Political Science and International Affairs; Director, Institute for Global and International Studies
Professor Sell received her B.A. in political science from Colorado College, her M.A. in political science from the University of California - Santa Barbara, and her Ph.D. from the University of California - Berkeley. Professor Sell offers graduate courses in international political economy, and international relations theory. She also offers an undergraduate international political economy course. Her publications include: "Intellectual Property and the Doha Round" in The WTO after Hong Kong: Progress In, and Prospects For, the Doha Development Agenda, eds. Donna Lee and Rorden Wilkinson (Routledge, 2007); "International Institutions, Intellectual Property an the HIV/AIDS Pandemic" in HIV/AIDS and the Threat to National Security, eds. Robert Ostergaard and Jim Whitman (Palgrave/MacMillan, 2007); Intellectual Property Rights: A Critical History, with Christopher May (Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2006); "Reframing the Issue: the WTO Coalition on Intellectual Property and Public Health 2001", with John Odell, in Negotiating Trade: Developing Countries in the WTO and NAFTA, ed. John Odell (Cambridge University Press, 2006); and Private Power, Public Law: The Globalization of Intellectual Property Rights (Cambridge University Press, 2003; published by China Renmin University Press, 2007).
Homepage: http://elliott.gwu.edu/faculty/sell.cfm.

Stephen Smith, Professor of Economics and International Affairs
Professor Smith received his PhD in Economics from Cornell University and has been a Fulbright Research Scholar and a Jean Monnet Research Fellow. Professor Smith is the author of Ending Global Poverty: A Guide to What Works (Palgrave Macmillan, 2005); co-author with Michael Todaro of Economic Development (10th Ed., Addison-Wesley, 2008); and co-editor with Jennifer Brinkerhoff and Hildy Teegen of NGOs and the Millennium Development Goals: Citizen Action to Reduce Poverty (Palgrave Macmillan, June 2007). He is also author or coauthor of some three dozen journal articles, and numerous other publications. He serves as an Associate Editor of the Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization. Professor Smith is Director of the Elliott School's Institute for International Economic Policy. He was the director of the Research Program in Poverty, Development, and Globalization from 2008-2009. He also served as the first director of the Elliott School's International Development Studies Program. Professor Smith has done on-site research and program work in several regions of the developing world including Bangladesh, China, Ecuador, India, Uganda, and the Former Yugoslavia, and has been a consultant for the World Bank, the International Labour Office (ILO, Geneva), and the World Institute for Development Economics Research (UN-WIDER, Helsinki). He has also conducted extensive research on the economics of employee participation, including works councils, ESOPs, and labor cooperatives, which has included on-site research in Italy, Spain, and Germany, as well as China and India.
Homepage: http://elliott.gwu.edu/faculty/smith_s.cfm.

Tara Sinclair, Professor of Economics and International Affairs
Tara Sinclair earned a B.A. in Foreign Languages from Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from Washington University in St. Louis. Before starting graduate school, she worked as a commercial real estate appraiser in Chicago. She was also a visiting scholar at the St. Louis Federal Reserve. Her research interests focus on modeling, explaining, and forecasting business cycle fluctuations and economic growth for different countries. Her publications include: "The Relationships between Permanent and Transitory Movements in U.S. Output and the Unemployment Rate," in the Journal of Money, Credit, and Banking, "Asymmetry in the Business Cycle: Friedman's Plucking Model with Correlated Innovations," in Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, "Output Fluctuations in the G-7: An Unobserved Components Approach" with Sinchan Mitra in Macroeconomic Dynamics, and "Can the Fed Predict the State of the Economy?" with Fred Joutz and H.O. Stekler in Economics Letters. She contributes regularly to the Survey of Professional Forecasters and is also co-director of the GWU Research Program on Forecasting. She teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in macroeconomics and econometrics.
Homepage: http://home.gwu.edu/~tsinc/.

Emmanuel Teitelbaum Emmanuel Teitelbaum, Assistant Professor of Political Science and International Affairs
Professor Teitelbaum received his Ph.D. from Cornell University in 2006. His research gravitates around topics concerning the relationship between foreign direct investment and labor standards and industrial conflict in developing countries. His research examines the political roots of class conflict and the foundations of class compromise. His articles have appeared in leading journals, including World Politics, Comparative Political Studies, Political Research Quarterly, PS: Political Science & Politics, the Journal of Development Studies and Critical Asian Studies. His forthcoming book, Managing Dissent: Government Responses to Industrial Conflict in Post-Reform South Asia, explores the dynamics of state-labor relations and industrial conflict following the implementation of neoliberal economic reforms. Professor Teitelbaum's research has received support from the United States Institute of Peace, the National Science Foundation, the Fulbright Foundation and the Social Science Research Council. He was the recipient of the 2007 Gabriel Almond Award for Best Dissertation in Comparative Politics.
Homepage: http://home.gwu.edu/~ejt/Home.html.

Robert J. Weiner, Professor of International Business, Public Policy and Public Administration, and International Affairs
Dr. Weiner received his Ph.D. in Business Economics from Harvard University in 1986. He teaches international finance, economics, and strategy. He is concurrently Associate Director of GEFRI (Global and Entrepreneurial Finance Research Institute), a GW chartered research center, and Membre Associe, GREEN (Groupe de Recherche en Economie de l'Energie et des Ressources Naturelles), Departement d'economique, Universite Laval, Quebec. Professor Weiner has also taught at Harvard University, Brandeis University, and the Royal Complutense University (Spain). He has lectured to executives in Russia, Spain, and the United States. He was the Gilbert White Fellow at Resources for the Future, an energy think-tank, from 2005-2006, and Visiting Professor of International Economics at the Johns Hopkins University School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) from 1997-1998. Professor Weiner has been Research Fellow in the International Energy Program, Center for Business and Government, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University and consultant to the International Petroleum Exchange; the New York Mercantile Exchange; the U.S. Department of Energy; the U.S. International Trade Commission; the Harvard Institute for International Development; the World Bank; and private clients. He has won research awards from the Ministere des Affaires Internationales, Quebec; Resources for the Future; the Columbia Center for the Study of Futures Markets; and the U.S. National Science Foundation.
Homepage: http://home.gwu.edu/~rweiner/.